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This page answers most of the common queries that we receive about our licenses, licensing of our software, and packaging or redistributing of our software. For non-licensing questions, please see our General FAQ.

:Frequent Questions about Apache Licensing

  1. 全讯彩票登录 www.pvadw.icu Where can I find the Apache license?

  2. Why are the license files for the different Apache Software Foundation projects different?

  3. Is 'Apache' a trademark?

  4. Is software from The Apache Software Foundation free?

  5. What are the U.S. Export Classification Control Numbers (ECCNs) for the various Apache software packages?

  6. May I license my own software under the Apache license?

  7. How should I apply the Apache License to my own software?

  8. May I re-use (and modify) the ASF Contributor License Agreements (CLAs) for my own purposes?

  9. May I re-use (and modify) the Apache License 2.0 itself?

  10. I've made improvements to the Apache code; may I distribute it?

  11. May I call my modified code 'Apache'?

  12. I have made changes to an Apache package and I want to distribute them. Do I need to contribute them to the Apache Software Foundation?

  13. May I translate the Apache license into my local language for my redistribution of Apache packages?

  14. Is the Apache license compatible with the GPL (GNU Public License)?

  15. What is the scope of patent grants made to the ASF?

  16. Can ASF PMCs host projects that are not under the Apache License?

  17. Are contributor's employers required to sign a CCLA?

  18. What is the provenance of source code from the ASF?

If none of the above addresses your query, please check the resources at the bottom of this page for general information.

Answers

Here are the detailed answers for each of the questions above.

Where can I find the Apache license?

You can find the Apache License 2.0 (the current version) here:

These are two older versions that we no longer use:

Why are the license files for the different Apache Software Foundation projects different?

While the core Apache developed code will be under one of the Apache licenses, other third party works may have been included and their license text may have been added to the Apache projects' LICENSE or NOTICE files. Alternatively, they may be available separately.

Is 'Apache' a trademark?

'Apache', 'Apache Software Foundation', the multicoloured feather, and the various Apache project names and logos are either registered trademarks or trademarks of The Apache Software Foundation in the United States and other countries. Please see our Trademark Policy for details of how to use Apache project trademarks or our helpful site map of trademark resources.

Is software from The Apache Software Foundation free of charge?

Yes. All software developed by all projects of The Apache Software Foundation is freely available without charge from the Foundation's web sites. This is specified in the Foundation's Articles of Incorporation and explained in more detail about why our software is always free (no charge).

This is regardless of the use of the software. We do not distinguish between personal, internal, or commercial use of our software, and we do not charge for any of them. A reminder, however, that the terms of our license always apply.

What are the U.S. Export Classification Control Numbers (ECCNs) for the various Apache software packages?

Please see the ASF Exports Classifications and Source Links page.

May I license my own software under the Apache license?

Certainly. Version 2.0 of the license was designed to be reusable, and often has been reused by parties other than the ASF.

How should I apply the Apache License to my own software?

You should include a copy of the Apache License, typically in a file called LICENSE, in your work, and consider also including a NOTICE file.

It is also valuable to tag each of your source code files in case they become detached from the LICENSE file. To apply the Apache License to your source code files, one approach is to attach the following boilerplate notice to as a comment at the top of the files. You should replace the Copyright templates with your own identifying information:

Copyright [yyyy] [name of copyright owner]

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at

    //www.pvadw.icu/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.

A shorter variant you may wish to use is:

Copyright [yyyy] [name of copyright owner]
SPDX-License-Identifier: Apache-2.0

Note that the Apache Software Foundation uses a different source header that is related to our use of a CLA. Our instructions for our project's source headers are here.

May I re-use (and modify) the ASF Contributor License Agreements (CLAs) for my own purposes?

Yes, you are allowed to re-use and modify them. You just can't hold the ASF legally responsible if these documents are not exactly what you intend them to be. We recommend that you obtain your own legal advice so you know exactly what you are getting yourself into.

And if you adapt these agreements for your purposes, you have to make sure that the phrase 'Apache Software Foundation' or any confusingly similar references or parts that specifically refer to the Apache organisation do not appear in your version of the agreements (except to note that your version is derived and differs from the original provided by the ASF).

May I re-use (and modify) the Apache License 2.0 itself?

Yes, you are allowed to re-use and modify it. You obviously can't hold the ASF legally responsible if this document, with or without changes, is not exactly what you intend it to be. We recommend that you obtain your own legal advice so you know exactly what you are getting yourself into.

And if you adapt the agreement for your purposes, you have to make sure that the phrase 'Apache License', 'Apache', or any confusingly similar references or parts that specifically refer to the Apache organization do not appear in your version of the license (except to note that your version is derived and differs from the original provided by the ASF).

I've made improvements to the Apache code; may I distribute the modified result?

Absolutely -- subject to the terms of the Apache license, of course. You can give your modified code away for free, or sell it, or keep it to yourself, or whatever you like. Just remember that the original code is still covered by the Apache license and you must comply with its terms. Even if you change every single line of the Apache code you're using, the result is still based on the Foundation's licensed code. You may distribute the result under a different license, but you need to acknowledge the use of the Foundation's software. To do otherwise would be stealing.

If you think your changes would be found useful by others, though, we do encourage you to submit them to the appropriate Apache project for possible inclusion.

May I call my modified code 'Apache'?

In a word, no. You may, however, use phrasing such as 'based on Apache', 'powered by Apache', or 'based on Apache technology'. You must not use the Foundation's marks in any way that states or implies, or can be interpreted as stating or implying, that the final product is endorsed or created by the Apache Software Foundation. For example, it would be acceptable to use a name like 'SuperWonderServer powered by Apache', but never a name like 'Apache SuperWonderServer'. This is similar to the distinction between a product named 'Microsoft Burp' and 'Burp for Microsoft Windows'.

You may similarly identify the specific Foundation project whose code you're using, such as with 'based on Apache Xerces' or 'powered by Apache Tomcat technology'.

If you wish to use a name including any of the Foundation's marks, such as the word 'Apache', it's best to ask our permission first. Please see our Trademark Policy for more details.

I have made changes to an Apache package and I want to distribute them. Do I need to contribute them to the Apache Software Foundation?

No. You can keep your changes a secret if you like. Maybe your modifications are embarrassing, maybe you'll get rich selling those improvements. Whatever. But please seriously consider giving your changes back! We all benefit when you do.

May I translate the Apache license into my local language for my redistribution of Apache packages?

Yes, you may translate the license text into your local language. However , any such translated text is only for the convenience of understanding, and is not legally binding. Only the English-language version of the license, which you must continue to include in your packaging , is authoritative and applicable in case legal interpretation is required.

Is the Apache license compatible with the GPL (GNU Public License)?

From the Free Software Foundation website:

Apache License, Version 2.0

This is a free software license, compatible with version 3 of the GPL. Please note that this license is not compatible with GPL version 2, because it has some requirements that are not in that older version. These include certain patent termination and indemnification provisions.

What is the scope of patent grants made to the ASF?

This is a four part question:

Q1:
If I own a patent and contribute to a Work, and, at the time my contribution is included in that Work, none of my patent's claims are subject to Apache's Grant of Patent License, is there a way any of those claims would later become subject to the Grant of Patent License solely due to subsequent contributions by other parties who are not licensees of that patent.
A1:
No.
Q2:
If at any time after my contribution, I am able to license other patent claims that would have been subject to Apache's Grant of Patent License if they were licenseable by me at the time of my contribution, do those other claims become subject to the Grant of Patent License?
A2:
Yes.
Q3:
If I own or control a licensable patent and contribute code to a specific Apache product, which of my patent claims are subject to Apache's Grant of Patent License?
A3:
The only patent claims that are licensed to the ASF are those you own or have the right to license that read on your contribution or on the combination of your contribution with the specific Apache product to which you contributed as it existed at the time of your contribution. No additional patent claims become licensed as a result of subsequent combinations of your contribution with any other software. Note, however, that licensable patent claims include those that you acquire in the future, as long as they read on your original contribution as made at the original time. Once a patent claim is subject to Apache's Grant of Patent License, it is licensed under the terms of that Grant to the ASF and to recipients of any software distributed by the ASF for any Apache software product whatsoever.
Q4:
What is an Apache product?
A4:
An Apache product is a body of software being developed by the ASF that the ASF intends to both alter and to publish as a separate line of releases.

Can ASF PMCs host projects that are not under the Apache License?

No. If you are an ASF PMC with a truly exceptional situation, please create a JIRA issue.

Are contributor's employers required to sign a CCLA?

Only if their employment situation necessitates that a CCLA be signed. See section 4 of the ICLA for details.

Committers must sign an ICLA. They make an individual claim that the code that they contribute is theirs to license. Reviewing their ICLA against their employer's ownership interests, applicable state and national law, and specific aspects of their employment contract and business policies will reveal that they can or cannot make that claim regarding any particular commit to whichever particular project they are committing in.

The CCLA is a backup document that the committer/ICLA signer may use to eliminate all of the ambiguity between all these conflicting laws, contracts, policies and job assignments. We've never required it, many committers are confident of their individual representations under the ICLA, many other committers find it reassuring that their company has backed up their own ICLA with this umbrella document.

It is the ICLA signatory's call if it is required, but it isn't exactly an easy call for many committers employed in the IT/Software industry.

Finally, see section 8 of the ICLA, which requires signers to notify the Foundation when their status changes in ways that may require this to be reassessed.

What is the provenance of source code from the ASF?

Source code (including machine-readable documentation, release notes, guides, test cases, run books, and scripts) in Apache repositories falls into three classifications (solely for the purpose of this discussion):

Code developed at Apache under Apache governance, licensed to Apache by its developers under a Contributor License Agreement, distributed by Apache, and licensed to downstream users under the Apache license

This represents most code at Apache. The code contains a standard Apache license header which refers to the standard Apache license in the distribution.

Code developed elsewhere, licensed to Apache under a Software Grant Agreement, incorporated into Apache projects, distributed by Apache, and licensed to downstream users under the Apache license

This is code that is being brought into Apache for future development as part of an Apache project. The headers on all files are changed to the standard Apache header. Most incubator projects start as externally-developed code and the Intellectual Property Clearance process is done as part of incubation.

Code that is originally developed elsewhere and is being brought into Apache for future development as part of an existing project must have the Intellectual Property Clearance process done explicitly by the PMC of the receiving project, under the auspices of the Incubator PMC which must approve the process.

Code developed elsewhere, received under a Category A license, incorporated into Apache projects, distributed by Apache, and licensed to downstream users under its original license

This code retains its external identity and is being incorporated into an Apache project for convenience, to avoid referencing an external repository whose contents are not under control of the project. The code retains its original license; and distribution as part of the Apache project explicitly calls out the license. The code retains its original header which refers to its own license in the distribution. If changes are made to the code while at Apache, the standard Apache header is prepended to each changed file. Additionally, any legally-required notices related to the code are published in the distribution.

Another Place to Look

If you have questions about The Apache Software Foundation, its projects, or its software, we recommend the following link for more information or assistance:

If you have a question specifically about the Apache license or distribution of Apache software, and it has not been answered by this page, please contact the Legal Affairs Committee.

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